View Post

Being Seán.

In Art, Blog, Film by Rashers TierneyLeave a Comment

Above: A still of Seán and an iconic United Irishman cover. Check out the trailer for the documentary which is being premiered on Tuesday May 15th in the Sugar Club. Tickets available here. Seán Garland is one of the giants of Irish republicanism. As a young man he bore the slain body of the mythologized Sean South after the  Brookeborough raid during the Border Campaign. He led a life that put … Read More

View Post

Taking Back Trinners.

In Blog, Politics by Ruaidhri Kiersey Leave a Comment

  Above:  A photo of the protesters outside the Book of Kells from Trinity SU’s Twitter page. Followthem for more. Last week TCD students blocked access to Trinity via the Front Gate and prevented tourists from viewing the book of Kells. In the last few hours, they have moved on (with the support of the SU) to blocking the entrances to the college and have began occupying the dining hall. … Read More

View Post

Translation Years.

In Art, Blog, Culture, Politics by Patrick McCuskerLeave a Comment

  Kabosh is a company on a mission to challenge the very notion of what theatre is. Their latest play Lives in Translation sold out the Belfast Festival in 2017 and is back for another run. It hones in on the survival instinct of one woman as she navigates conflict and gets stuck in the suffocating bureaucratic purgatory of the asylum process. Rosemary Jenkinson shared some thoughts about the production … Read More

View Post

Limerick.

In Blog by RashersLeave a Comment

  The annual Limerick Spring Festival is on at the moment. There’s an exhibition called Art In Uncertain Times that takes hope as its theme. There’ll be a panel discussion as part of the event with Kerry Guinan, Vukasin Nedeljkovic, Eve Olney, Kate O’ Shea, Executive Steve, Dara Waldron and Fiona Woods. Performance by Aishling Urwin. More on that here and there’s to be a performance by the Cut Out … Read More

View Post

Season Of The Witch.

In #rabble14, Art, Culture, Politics, Print Edition by Caitriona DeveryLeave a Comment

Bristling with political resonances, Jesse Jones picks apart hidden histories of dissent and resistance. Her installation Tremble Tremble, represented Ireland at this year’s Art Olympics, the Venice Biennale. It features iconic theatre artist Olwen Fouéré and was inspired by research into witches and other feminist histories that are still relevant to contemporary Ireland. Caitriona Devery caught up with her to chat about art and politics.

View Post

For Whom The Bell Trolls.

In #rabble14, Blog, Print Edition by Kyle MulhollandLeave a Comment

The Ministry of Strategic Affairs have denounced the global BDS campaign as anti-semitic and have fought it tooth and nail. Now, they have adopted a new strategy that combines the addictive nature of video games with the insidious cacophony of internet trolling. Kyle Mulholland gets down in the mire and takes a look.

View Post

Five Irish Companies Profiteering From Occupation.

In #rabble14, Blog, Print Edition by Kev SquiresLeave a Comment

Above: A photo by Dennis Jarvis from Flickr. Both home and abroad, companies are profiteering left, right and centre from the Israel apartheid state. kev squires give us the lowdown on six companies that directly benefit from the occupation and put a corporate sheen over Isreal’s continued barbarity. Hewlett-Packard HP is up to its eyes in profiteering from Israel’s occupation and human rights abuses. HP’s technology and equipment facilitate Israel’s … Read More

View Post

The Vampire Simon.

In #rabble14, Blog, Fiction, Print Edition by Simone HarresLeave a Comment

Colours and faces swim past him as he readjusts to the light and tips out his cigarette with a hairless white arm. He glances at his desk, completely clean with a gilded leather finish replaced only this week reflecting the city lights outside. He has relinquished all forms of paper communication.

View Post

Mic Drop.

In Blog by WedgeLeave a Comment

The IFTAs have become known for ironically poor production values, a list of no shows longer than your Dad’s Facebook posts and (for those who do actually tune in) “how come that chancer won an award?” moments. However, Cardboard Gangsters star John Connors, in one or two sentences spoke real truth on the nature of Irish film and TV.