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Brick In The Wall.

In #rabble13, Blog, History, Print Edition by Eoin O'Mahony0 Comments

Broadstone – Iosta Na Cloiche Leithne – is a right bruiser of a building that sits over the no-place between the north inner city and Phibsborough. Eoin O’Mahony takes a look at how we fetishise old infrastructure. It’s a terminus, a prayer place, a station in need of a train. Until recently there was a half legible wooden sign near the traffic lights, “Rosary Recited, Very [sic] Sun. at 3pm … Read More

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Shadow Of The Glen.

In #rabble13, Blog, History, Politics, Print Edition by Tómas Lynch0 Comments

Above:  Glenmalure House in Wicklow. You need to cross a river in a car (if your beat up old jalopy can handle it…) to reach the place and it once played host to the likes of Yeats who wrote a poem about it. Tomás Lynch takes a look at the dwindling number of An Oige hostels throughout the country. On his rambles he stumbles across issues of privatisation, a fall … Read More

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Reflections On Apollo.

In #rabble13, Blog, History, Interviews, Politics, Print Edition by Tommy Gavin0 Comments

  As the Apollo Story progressed, most of the press attention focused on the artists, and a very small number of organisers. However, the real story of Apollo House is and always was the volunteers, over 700 of whom gave up their time to make it what it was. A stark reminder that the current housing system is broken beyond repair, and that a better world is possible. Tommy Gavin … Read More

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Rave Against The Machine.

In #rabble13, Blog, History, Music, Print Edition by Rashers Tierney0 Comments

Photographer Matthew Smith’s Exist To Resist documents the history of activism and having it in the years before and after the infamous Criminal Justice Act of 1994. This was a cunning piece of legislation designed to wipe out rave culture in the UK. The project smashed through its initial ask on Kickstarter by doubling its target.  This isn’t another huckster making dollar off memory- it’s a sharp reminder of what … Read More

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Stop the Trams!

In #rabble12, Highlights, History, Politics, Print Edition by Donal Fallon0 Comments

While Luas Cross City work continues apace in Dublin, there was a noticeable absence of Luas trams at times. The just settled industrial dispute between tram drivers and their employer grew proper bitter at times, yet as Donal Fallon finds it’s certainly not the first major strike involving Dublin’s tram drivers.

While much has changed in recent decades, some things haven’t – there was nothing new about some of the discourse around the recent Luas dispute, depicting workers as overfed and underworked.

If anything would surprise Dubliners of old about the current dispute, it is perhaps the fact there are tramlines at all. When the last Dublin United Tramways Company route closed in July 1949 (the No.8 to Dalkey, for any pub quiz aficionados) many believed they were waving goodbye to a form of public transport for ever.

In the Sunday Independent, one writer made it clear that “I am sorry for the demise of the trams, but as a motorist I just cannot weep for them. They had become an incorrigible block to modern traffic, holding always, as they did, the middle of the road…Yet, the trams are dead, and it is time for them to lie down.” By the 1940s, the tram seemed a relic of the past.

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Revolution For Sale.

In Blog, Culture, History, Interviews by Catriona Devery0 Comments

Souvenir Shop is one of the Arts Council’s major Easter 1916 commemorative projects. The shop is located in a ramshackle old Georgian house on North Great George’s St. Rita Duffy has filled the shop with subversive products inspired by the revolutionary 1916 period. Catriona Devery caught up with Rita to talk about the show.

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The Reel Women Of 1916.

In Blog, History by Rashers Tierney0 Comments

  Shot in the style of the old news reels, this short film project aims to emphasis the role of women in 1916. With just days left on their Fund:it appeal, we caught up with comedian Elaine Gallagher to chat about the centenary year. Hi Elaine, so how’s the Fund:it campaign going? Fairly stressful? Hey, it’s going okay. It’s a full time job, constantly plugging the campaign and you start … Read More

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Tuam Babies.

In #rabble11, Highlights, History, Politics, Print Edition by Adrienne Corless3 Comments

When the case of the 796 Tuam babies became global news in Summer 2014, locals there found the then little-known burial ground of the former Mother and Baby home in the glare of the public eye. Adrienne Corless writes about the need to face difficult truths.   A Commission of Investigation, headed by Judge Yvonne Murphy, aims to acknowledge and reveal what was once covered up in the entire country’s … Read More