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#rabbleEye: Heirlooms and Hand Me Downs.

In #rabble2, Culture, History, Print Edition by Lisa Crowne and Ciara Kennedy5 Comments

From cold-calling on flats – literally ringing on bells and knocking on doors and calling people on the phone. Then I found a contact who could introduce me to others. This made the process a little easier. I will not pretend that I found it easy to meet people – many were not interested in engaging with me. Some refused outright, others seemed to consider it yet when I turned up at a prearranged time to record a conversation they would not turn up or they had a change of mind or just would not answer the door or got someone else to answer the door.

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So, What Happened The Three Fs?

In #rabble2, Highlights, History, Illustration, Politics, Print Edition by Peg LeesonLeave a Comment

The current mess we are in is often explained by an unusual obsession with bricks and mortar rooted in a colonial history. The Irish love to own their own home because those nasty Brits didn’t let us, it’s the spectre of the famine all over again. At best these myths obscure the true reasons behind Ireland’s current economic situation.

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Reggae Hits The Town

In Blog, Culture, History, Interviews, Politics by James Redmond1 Comment

Dublin reggae fans and all sound system heads, are in for a real treat over the next few weeks: the Reggae Movement exhibition is due in town. Curated by Ronan Lynch of Irie Up magazine, the show promises an illustrated journey into the history of sound system culture, not to mention the chance to get your wind on to some dancehall. James Redmond hears why the only good system is a sound system.

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{Comics} Now Now Stolen Cow: The Cattle Raid of Cooley Comic.

In Blog, Culture, History, Interviews by Kev Squires26 Comments

Belfast comic creator Patrick Brown has just released the fifth print issue of his epic webcomic The Cattle Raid of Cooley. Patrick has been publishing roughly a page per week since August 2008, and his interpretation of one of Ireland’s most famous folk legends, the Táin Bó Cúailnge, now boasts 140 pages. To mark the release, Kevin Squires interviewed Patrick for rabble.ie: