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Bearing The Brunt.

In #rabble15, Blog, Browse, Politics, Print Edition by Paul DillonLeave a Comment

That our healthcare system is a source of fright for many isn’t anything new. it’s a dreaded rites of passage nearly to be left propped up on a trolley in a corridor as the numbers stuck waiting for bed reach an all-time high. Paul Dillon talks to the people that have turned tracking trolleys into one of the main statistical tropes of the crisis in our healthcare system about why … Read More

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Scandal Sheet From #rabble15

In #rabble15, Blog, Browse, Illustration, Politics, Print Edition by adminLeave a Comment

Keep the Pump Going Fella! Shane Ross spent most of his career in the Seanad and in Independent newspapers. He was elected to the Dail for the fi rst time in 2011, in Ireland’s recession election. It was rumoured he would run on a slate with the likes of Fintan O’Toole, David McWilliams and Eamon Dunphy. This never came to pass. Once in the Dail, he developed his anti establishment … Read More

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The Future Devoured?

In #rabble15, Blog, Print Edition by Aiysha TeeganLeave a Comment

Aiysha Teegan argues the Irish government is allowing us to freewheel off a dangerous slope of heart disease and climate destruction. Here she takes a look at how the Irish Farmers Organisation has us by the cajoles and how we are falling behind on our environmental commitments.

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Out Of His Bleedjin Shoebox.

In #rabble15, Art, Blog, Print Edition by Aoife Davis.Leave a Comment

Aoife Davis chats to Ciaran Nugent, Power FM broadcaster, DJ and flyer collector about his experiences with clubbing in Dublin and his ongoing research around club flyers. Providing her with a glimpse into a pivotal moment in Ireland’s recent past told through the medium of flyers, posters, goodie bags and teaser packs.

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Suburban Super Cinemas!

In #rabble15, Blog, Culture, History by PATRICK MCCUSKERLeave a Comment

The only indicator it was ever a cinema are its steeped motifs and the fading letters RIALT above the boarded windows and “SOLD” sign advertising its potential to investors. The “O” not being replaced is the final indignity for such a once-proud building. Even now, in its state of ruin, it looks utterly alien amidst a row of terraced redbrick houses, takeaways and phone repair shops. What must it have looked like when it opened on the 5th of November 1936 to great fanfare and the billing of “Dublin’s Suburban Super Cinema”?