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Left In the Cold.

In #rabble13, Art, Blog, Culture, Fiction, Interviews, Print Edition by Sean Finnan0 Comments

Last year playwright Alan O’Brien won the PJ O’Connor Award for Best New Radio Drama with Snow Falls and So Do We. rabble sent Sean Finnan along to chat to Alan about the play and why he refused RTÉ permission to broadcast the drama. So I guess to start with, what’s the play about? It was inspired by the death of Rachel Peavoy. When that happened I was amongst many that were just appalled by the whole thing. Having experienced living in Ballymun, our empirical knowledge tells us that it’s impossible to die by hypothermia once the heating is on … Read More

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The Rhymes Of History.

In Art, Blog, Culture, Interviews by Caitriona Devery0 Comments

I don’t really know enough about the contemporary aspirations of planning culture now to comment. But if you look at Milton Keynes in the UK as a prime example of 60’s utopianism, its history is hilarious. I got given a tour about 10 years ago, when I was looking to do a project there. Its original planners were entrenched in new-age ideology. They even sited its main artery, Midsummer Boulevard, on the axis of the summer solstice sunrise.

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The Baubles Family Punxmas.

In Blog, Music by Esop Eileen0 Comments

    There’s too much to do. Auntie Mary is doing me head in. All the shopping is inciting anxiety. There’s no tree up and the decorations are still in the attic. There’s too many christmas songs. Christ, there’s just too much christmas… The bahumbuggery always gives way in the end though. Generally thanks to good company, some time to put the feet up, or delicious pints. You succumb to the holiday atmosphere, with generosity order of the day. Music tends to play a part, and the long tradition of the christmas song gets an annual dusting off or a … Read More

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This Land Is…

In Art, Culture, Interviews by Catriona Devery0 Comments

Radicalism and reinvention are two prevalent themes running through programming for A Fair Land. Cultural and artistic activism were predominant in the creation of the political movement for 1916 and it was this gathering of energy, ambition, ideology and activism which A Fair Land sought to emulate, orientating the project towards a future vision moving forward in 2016.

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Rundfunk Der Dublin!

In Blog, Culture, Interviews, Music by beggars0 Comments

A new online radio station based in Dublin is about to take off. What’s in store? We checked in the DDR crew to find out.

So, a new digital radio station is in the pipeline. Tell us how it came about?

The idea was floating around in our heads for a while I think. A few of us have been involved in different forms of radio over the years and I think we all wondered why Dublin didn’t have something like this already. We went to Open Ear festival on Sherkin Island earlier this year and started talking seriously about it. A five hour car journey home with only national radio for company really got the wheels moving then. I wouldn’t wish that on anyone. I guess it’s a bit reactionary in that sense, we were a bit angry with the lack of coverage for certain areas of culture in Ireland so we are trying to fill that void in a small way.

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Vacuuming in an Uncanny Vacuum

In Art, Blog, Culture, Interviews by Caitriona Devery0 Comments

I think my work is politically charged at times. I am quite ambivalent to the conventional roles ascribed by society to gender. In particular, in our own constitution, the language that enshrines women for example to situations of compromise, for example article 41.2 which prioritises a woman’s domestic role over her career and 40.3.3 which ensures women are not given full their reproductive choices.

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Dissenting Drogheda.

In Blog, Culture, Highlights, Music, Politics by Martin Leen0 Comments

Nolan spent many months in Drogheda interviewing people who were involved in the punk community and gathering their stories of dissent including Paddy Dillon who disrupted Sunday mass in the early eighties by letting loose a clutch of hens.

This secret history is documented in the publication ‘Subvert All Power’ Drogheda’s Punk History, in the theatre space of the Droichead Arts Cent which will be launched on Saturday the 27th of August. To coincide with the launch there will be talks of feminist punk culture, 24 hour punk gigs and other goings on.
On Sunday 28th there will be a Parade of Dissent including banners, madzers and music through Drogheda and a punk picnic and a free punk concert.

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A Tale Of Bloody-Minded Tenacity.

In Blog, Culture, Interviews by Martin Leen0 Comments

When was Pallas formed?

Pallas was formed in 1996 when myself and Brian Duggan located a building on Foley Street. It was an old knitwear factory called Pallas Knitwear so after a bit of pre-ambling about a few different names we decided on Pallas because Pallas was the goddess of the muses, the goddess of intellect and the goddess of war. We knew we were going to be in for a rough ride so we wanted her on our side.

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Monkey Magic.

In #rabble12, Culture, Interviews, Print Edition by Bit Thompson0 Comments

Guerilla Studios stakes a claim to be the studio for underground bands in Dublin. Bit Thompson caught up with John ‘Spud’ Murphy and asked why they set up a recording studio when the arse has fallen out of the industry.   Well, how’s it going? So tell me how youse got started in the recording business? Well it started when I was in a band called Ilya K and we’d won the Murphy’s Live competition. We went around pricing studios and they were mad expensive. We all had a background in engineering and said “Fuck that, let’s set up a … Read More

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Two F-ing Bs

In #rabble12, Blog, Culture, Print Edition by Alan O'Brien0 Comments

Open any encyclopaedia on Ireland and invariably you will find two of Dublin’s finest wordweavers, Samuel Beckett and Brendan Behan, either on the same page or opposite pages eyeballing one another. Alan O’Brien takes a look at two Dubliners whose backgrounds couldn’t contrast any more entirely.

Beckett spent his childhood in the sleepy-affluent and sheltered area of Foxrock. Behan, had his formative years in the overcrowded Dublin metropolis of the 1920s and hungry 30s. Beckett’s education was of the highest standard a well-to-do Protestant family could expect; attending Miss Elsners Academy, the Royal Portora, Enniskillen and Trinners. While Behan’s education was of the highest standard a working-class family with Irish-republican politics (that was as much of a staple diet as tea, bread and margarine) could expect; attending William Street Convent, St. Canices Christian Brothers, Bolton Street Tech and Jail.