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Take Five: 1916 Crass Cash Ins.

In #rabble12, Blog, Humour, Print Edition by rabble0 Comments

While the regime tried their damnedest to depoliticise and adapt the centenary of 1916 to their own ends, the Blueshirt class of shopkeepers and bankers were found once again fumbling in their greasy tills, Shucking history for a few pennies over the odds. Let’s starry plough through some examples. 1. Connolly Shot Glasses Carroll’s brand of sheep clutching, flat cap wearing Guinness swilling leprechauns is hardly going to turn its eye to the rising with any sensitivity. If chocolate bar proclamations weren’t bad enough, one can only imagine what our lost labour leader Connolly would have thought of his mustachioed visage ending up emblazoned across a cheap shot glass. Well we don’t have to wonder too hard, Connolly was an avowed pioneer and so dismissive of the demon drink it’s believed he legged it to the states in 1903 sickened by his comrades wasting subscriptions money on liquor. 2. The Mayo Tapesty You might have forgotten that awful banner strewn from the Bank of Ireland on College Green but we … Read More

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Revolution For Sale.

In Blog, Culture, History, Interviews by Catriona Devery0 Comments

Souvenir Shop is one of the Arts Council’s major Easter 1916 commemorative projects. The shop is located in a ramshackle old Georgian house on North Great George’s St. Rita Duffy has filled the shop with subversive products inspired by the revolutionary 1916 period. Catriona Devery caught up with Rita to talk about the show.

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The Reel Women Of 1916.

In Blog, History by Rashers Tierney0 Comments

  Shot in the style of the old news reels, this short film project aims to emphasis the role of women in 1916. With just days left on their Fund:it appeal, we caught up with comedian Elaine Gallagher to chat about the centenary year. Hi Elaine, so how’s the Fund:it campaign going? Fairly stressful? Hey, it’s going okay. It’s a full time job, constantly plugging the campaign and you start to feel you’re annoying people after a while but I suppose it’s all part of the process – keep informing people about it until they finally contribute and/or tell their friends about the project. You talk about how the women of the 1916 rising have been airbrushed out of history, and in the case of Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell, she was literally airbrushed. Can you give us some more examples of women being airbrushed out, in the metaphorical sense this time perhaps? It is astonishing that it’s only with the centenary commemorations that we’ve started to learn names like Dr. Kathleen … Read More

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Remember.

In Blog by Rashers Tierney0 Comments

Spotted in Phibsboro earlier on. Locals are getting ready to lay a wreath in memory of local lad Micheal O’Hanrahan who was executed on this day in 1916.

He lived at 67 Connaught St and fought in Jacob’s Mill during the rising. He was a gaelic scholar, IRB activist and quartermaster of the Irish Volunteers. The event is being organized by the Cabra 1916 Rising Committee.

More details on Facebook.

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Remembering North King St.

In Blog by Rashers Tierney0 Comments

  Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project have a commemoration lined up later today. It’s to remember sixteen locals murdered by the South Staffordshire regiment on this very weekend one hundred years ago. As they have it themselves: “Join the local community at 2.30pm at Kavanagh’s Pub on Aughrim Street for a short march to North King Street where a plaque inscribed with the names of the 16 men and boys will be unveiled. Relatives and descendants of the victims will be in attendance and the plaque will be unveiled by 82 year old Betty Ivers, relative of 16 year old William O’Neill.” Up top you’ll find a song in their honor performed by O’Shea and Duffy. More deets on Facebook.